5 Misleading Advertising Ploys To Beware Of This Black Friday

Published November 1, 2019

1. Very limited quantities

That $200-off supersized TV on the front page of the big-box circular that landed in your mailbox looks like an incredible deal-until you show up at the store on Black Friday and find it's sold out. Of course, no deal lasts forever, but when a store that's only been open for the day a few hours, claims it's run out of an item, you can assume it only stocked a limited quantity.

When checking out the ads for Black Friday, look for an "In-Stock Guarantee" or a "1-hour In-Stock Guarantee." This will allow you to get a rain check for a sold-out item as long as you show up on Black Friday, or in the case of the 1-hour guarantee, as long as you show up within the first hour of opening.

2. No discount

In this ploy, retailers deceive shoppers into thinking a product is on sale. They'll list an item in a Black Friday circular so you'll assume it's being offered at a discount when it's actually being sold at regular price. Do a quick check of an item's standard selling price before running out to buy it on Black Friday.

3. Full price with a store gift card

At first glance, a regular-priced item that comes with a store gift card can seem like a fantastic deal; however, some research might reveal this product is being sold elsewhere on Black Friday for less. Also, if you're not a regular customer at this store, you may end up blowing that gift card on stuff you don't need.

4. Sales based on a dishonest manufacturer's price

When retailers advertise their sales, they'll often post the manufacturer's suggested retail price, or MSRP, for customers to compare. However, this value can be theoretical at best and simply dishonest at worst. If the item was never actually sold at the listed MSRP, the number is essentially meaningless.

Avoid getting pulled in by this deceptive advertising ploy by checking out an item's retail price online.

5. Stripped-down or downgraded versions

When shopping for computers and TVs, read up on every feature offered with the product. A common Black Friday ruse is to advertise a discounted item, which offers the very minimum in features and accessories. These "add-ons" are often essential features whose lack can make the device almost useless until you buy them.